Frequently Asked Questions

Find answers to commonly asked questions about our products.
Click on the plus (+) sign beside the questions below to reveal the answer.

Why are there so many different kinds of cables to choose from?

To allow installation for different applications (i.e. push-pull or pull-only). There are various constructions and engineered materials to meet specific customer requirements made by Cablecraft®.

Do you design cable controls for specific applications?

Yes, approximately 80% of our business is custom designed controls.

Can your cable controls be used on aircraft?

Yes, we have a specific aircraft product line for home built as well as certified aircraft.

How do you compare to your competitor's cables?

Our main discerning difference is the ability to install our controls in a much tighter bend radius than our competitor’s controls. Because of our association with aircraft, ordnance and industrial applications, we are able to utilize technical advances across all product lines.

What is a typical failure mode?

Our design, unlike most of our competitors, is decreased efficiency as opposed to failure due to separation. Our design doesn’t fail without warning to the operator.

Is there cable selection information? Is it good for all applications?

Yes, there are load capability diagrams to aid in specific application selections. Catalog loads are not specific for all applications, but should be treated as guidelines. Contact an engineer for advice.

Do you offer mounting hardware and accessories that don't appear in the catalog?

Yes, we have 55+ years of application design experience. Contact Sales for suggestions.

My question is not addressed here. How do I contact an engineer?

Please complete the Contact Us form and an engineer will be in contact shortly.

What direction is an axial load?

The load is applied along the axis of the ball bore or ball stud.

In what direction is a radial load?

The load is applied along the axis of the female housing or male shank.

What is axial play (in/out play)?

This is a measurement of the total range of movement of the ball in the cavity in the axial direction or the clearance measured along the axis of the bore and ball stud.

What is radial play (end play)?

This is a measurement of the total range of movement of the ball in the cavity in the radial direction or the clearance measured along the axis of the female housing or male shank.

How is a rod end tensile test performed?

Using a load cell the rod end is secured by placing a pin horizontally through the ball bore and securing it to a test block. The threads on the housing or shank are fastened to a pull rod. The part at this point is in a vertical position with the head secured. The rod end is then pulled until failure in the radial direction.

How is a rod end ball pull-out test performed?

The shank or housing is slip fit into a collar in the horizontal direction. A pull rod is then placed through the ball bore. The rod end ball is then pulled in the axial direction until it is removed from the rod end housing.

What is the water absorption of Cablecraft's nylon race?

0.2% (data acquired from supplier catalogs per ASTM Test D570 for 35-45% glass fill).

What is the recommended operating temperature range of Cablecraft's nylon race?

The rod ends may be continuously run in a range from -30°F to 220°F (-34°C to 104°C).

When tightening a fastener to a Cablecraft low carbon steel rod end or ball joint stud what torque may I apply?

Nuts may be torqued to a Grade 2 SAE torque specification for the appropriate thread size.

What type of corrosion resistance do your zinc plated rod ends and ball joints offer.

All zinc plated rod ends and ball joints are plated per ASTM B633. Typically, red rust develops after 96 hours of salt spray testing for zinc coated parts with clear dichromate.

Does Cablecraft offer custom applications?

Yes, we offer a wide variety of linkage assemblies and custom linkage components including a wide variety of double ended connecting rod assemblies. Please contact a Cablecraft representative to find out more.

What is the difference between a ball joint and a rod end?

Ball joints are typically used in an application where the axial and radial play are not as critical. A rod end may also come in the studded or non-studded form, where a ball joint is constructed of a housing and a one piece ball stud. Ball joints are typically less expensive than rod ends. Rod ends would be recommended for a higher load and precision application.

What type of test data do you have available on your products?

Listed in the Cablecraft catalog are radial (tensile) test load values. On a majority of these products, axial (ball pullout) and wear tests have also been performed. To see if data that interests you is available refer to the information in our product catalog. If the data you need is not there, you can contact a member of the Cablecraft Engineering staff.

My question is not addressed here. How do I contact an engineer?

Please complete the Contact Us form and an engineer will be in contact shortly.